‘The Fruit Family’: a series on wealth and power in a modern context

Until I went to secondary school, art was of no real importance to me.  There were no artists in my family, and being a part of a huge Indian network meant that we had way too many family gatherings for my parents to take the time out to take me to a local art gallery.

The lack of enthusiasm for art in my family, while sad, was also understandable, since migration is a strong memory for many; making the effect of such felt by all. Working hard to ensure financial and familial stability which was once uncertain has been a fundamental force of motivation when it comes to finding a career, and while the job market is changing for those in the arts, STEM subjects still present themselves as the safer career path.  Therefore, for me to decide to do a humanities degree and pursue art in my spare time not only came as a shock when compared to cousins who were following careers in medicine, dentistry, and everything in between; but also presented itself as a newfound sign of privilege for which I am very grateful to have; and a statement that South Asian migrant children do have a place in the artistic world.

Here are images of my most recent project: The Fruit Family. This series is dedicated to the people who I will be living with this year. It aims to bring the power and wealth which fruit once symbolised into a modern context, with its use of non-classical painting techniques and almost mocking noble expressions. Most importantly: it is a reminder for everyone to have their five-a-day.

 

Images: via Manvir Dobb

 

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