Their Finest

Their Finest is an elegant and animated story that follows the determination and resilience of one young woman searching for her independence in the face of constant barriers. With 1940s London providing the backdrop, it is a touching film.

Catrin (Gemma Arteton) gets a job working as a writer, producing the women’s ‘slop’ (dialogue) for propaganda films during WWII. The film charts the growth of her self worth and ability, as her experience as a screenwriter allows her to gain a sense of independence.

Lone Sherfig, well known for An Education and One Day, has created another typical film of hers, yet this one is slightly less bitter and sophisticated around the edges. It perhaps compromised to be a more simple film to thus appeal and reach a wider audience. The film relies more on anecdotal, charm-filled moments than the hard hitting honest realities for women of the time. There is a slightly underdeveloped romantic relationship between the protagonists, to make it believable, yet their relationship depicts genuine human bonding and a great friendship that blossoms into something more. Bill Nighy is at his finest; playing a warm hearted gentle old soul who provides wisdom and comfort, yet still remaining politely, and awkwardly unaffectionate and British. Of course he has a high level of sarcasm and cynicism that reveals his insecurity, but always pulls through. It is a classic role for him and arguably the most engaging dynamic in the film is his relationship with Gemma Arterton’s character.

The film is filled with deep brown, beige and green hues that remind the audience of the office where the three writers work together to create these motivational and poignant propaganda films, complemented by the smooth soundtrack. Overall, Their Finest is a sweet and genuinely loving film that will brighten up anyone’s day.

Image: Eva Rinaldi

All Films reviewed at Cineworld, Edinburgh

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